Golden Milk Chai Tea ingredients shot with off-camera flash

Golden Milk Chai Tea ingredients shot with off-camera flash

I wrote a post at my other blog, Minimally Invasive, about a new concoction of mine called Golden Milk Chai Tea. I started out with the photo in that post, but found it boring. While it captured the essence of the tea well, I've done that type of food photography shot bazillions of times and wanted to do something different. So I tried a couple of alternate lighting setups and ended up with the photos I've posted here.

This wasn't JUST about boredom, though. Freelance work has been sloooooow this winter, and while I've been sending inquiry after inquiry, the offers haven't flooded in just yet. Working with different lighting setups has helped me to stay positive and maintain a strong work ethic, while preparing me for any eventuality that may come up on a shoot. I'm most comfortable working with natural light, having logged countless hours in front of our magical Sliding glass Door to Nowhere in the dining room, but over the past year I've also developed a real rapport with my studio lights — Frick and Frack, the Strobe brothers. So the last frontier for me is off-camera flash. If I were a portrait photographer, I would've gotten comfortable with it earlier, but with tabletop food photography and natural-light pet photography, it just hasn't been a priority. But things changed after seeing the beautiful work photographer Kyle Cassidy turns out with off-camera flash. (I met Kyle when my husband Gil interviewed him for his podcast last year — give it a listen —and immediately started following him on Facebook. You should, too.)

Golden Milk Chai Tea ingredients shot with Frick and Frack, the Strobe brothers

Golden Milk Chai Tea ingredients shot with Frick and Frack, the Strobe brothers

All of this is to say that the top photo was taken with an off-camera flash and reflective umbrella combo. For that shot, I wanted strong shadows and a minimal/clean setup and think I achieved that, even if it isn't the warmest look for food photography. The photo just above was taken with strobes and a softbox for softer light with the fill strobe aimed at the ceiling.

Styling is bare bones because I really wanted to work with few distractions, but I'm excited to see how this plays out in other ways with more complicated setups.

 

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